The Extraordinary Santa Maria in Cosmedin Fountain in Rome

Both Christian and pagan articles have been found in large quantities by archaeologists and restorers searching the area of the Santa Maria in Cosmedin in Rome. Located in the portico of the nearby basilica one can find the celebrated marble sculpture known as the Bocca della Verità (Mouth of Truth). When the Santa Maria in Cosmedin water fountain was built in 1719, it was off the beaten track and mostly unknown as a result. For the most part, people stayed away from the area because it was a bleak and deserted part of the city. It was a this time that Pope Clement XI mandated the Italian architect Carlo Bizzaccheri to put up a water fountain to refurbish the square outside the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin. bzbaw__77349.jpg August 11, 1717 marked the date when construction on the church’s infrastructure started. Medallions bearing the images of the Blessed Virgin, for whom the church is named, and of St. John the Baptist, the patron saint of water, were thrown in the foundation following the consecration of the first stone.

From Where Did Garden Water Fountains Originate from?

A water fountain is an architectural piece that pours water into a basin or jets it high into the air in order to supply drinking water, as well as for decorative purposes.

Pure practicality was the original role of fountains. Inhabitants of urban areas, townships and small towns utilized them as a source of drinking water and a place to wash, which meant that fountains had to be connected to nearby aqueduct or spring. Up until the 19th century, fountains had to be more elevated and closer to a water source, such as aqueducts and reservoirs, in order to benefit from gravity which fed the fountains. Fountains were not only used as a water source for drinking water, but also to adorn homes and celebrate the designer who created it. The main materials used by the Romans to create their fountains were bronze or stone masks, mostly depicting animals or heroes. During the Middle Ages, Muslim and Moorish garden planners incorporated fountains to create mini variations of the gardens of paradise. To show his prominence over nature, French King Louis XIV included fountains in the Garden of Versailles. To mark the entrance of the restored Roman aqueducts, the Popes of the 17th and 18th centuries commissioned the building of baroque style fountains in the spot where the aqueducts arrived in the city of Rome

The end of the 19th century saw the rise in usage of indoor plumbing to provide drinking water, so urban fountains were relegated to purely decorative elements. The introduction of special water effects and the recycling of water were two things made possible by replacing gravity with mechanical pumps.

Contemporary fountains are used to embellish public spaces, honor individuals or events, and enrich recreational and entertainment events.

Bernini's Public Fountains

There are countless famed Roman water fountains in its city center. Nearly all of them were planned, designed and built by one of the finest sculptors and designers of the 17th century, Gian Lorenzo Bernini. His skills as a water feature developer and also as a city architect, are evident throughout the avenues of Rome. Eventually travelling to Rome to completely show their artwork, chiefly in the form of public water features, Bernini’s father, a distinguished Florentine sculptor, mentored his young son. An exceptional worker, Bernin received compliments and the patronage of popes and important artists. He was initially celebrated for his sculpture. Working seamlessly with Roman marble, he used a base of experience in the historical Greek architecture, most obviously in the Vatican. Though he was influenced by many, Michelangelo had the most serious effect on him, both personally and professionally.

Agrippa's Astonishing, but Mostly Forgotten Water-Lifting Mechanism

Unfortuitously, Agrippa’s excellent design for lifting water was not referred to a great deal following 1588, when Andrea Bacci praised it widely. It could be that in 1592 when Rome’s latest channel, the Acqua Felice, began providing the Villa Medici, there was simply no longer very much need for the equipment. This is all the more sad given how spectacular Camillo Agrippa’s device was, entirely singular in Italy during the centuries that transpired between the fall of ancient Rome and the modern day period. There may have been some other significant water-related works in Renaissance gardens in the late sixteenth century, including fountains which played tunes, water caprices (or giochi d’acqua) and even scenographic water demonstrations, but nothing was operated by water which defied gravitation.

Pondless Fountains: Some of the Benefits of Having one in your Backyard

There are two names for this style of fountain: “disappearing” and “pondless”. It is known as “disappearing” due to the fact the water source is below ground. Disappearing fountains should be positioned near any place people hang out regularly, as they add so much to the surrounding area. There are many varieties of them including millstones, ceramic urns, granite columns, and natural-looking waterfalls.

A disappearing fountain could be the most suitable choice for you for a number of reasons. Any risk to anyone standing around it is averted since the water source is beneath ground level.

This means that youngsters can safely play around it. Moreover, you will not need to stress about losing water to evaporation since it is stored underground. This kind of fountain, therefore, is a good choice for regions where there is a need to conserve water. The water source will remain uncontaminated and free of dirt since it is below gound and algae will not grow in it, so you will not need to spend a lot of time cleaning it. Finally, due to its reduced size, it is easier to fit it where you want it than other types of fountains.

Introduce the Spirit of Feng Shui into Your Backyard

Integrating feng shui design into your yard will help spread its energy into your home and your life.

As far as the size of your garden goes, it is not especially important when introducing feng shui design to it. A huge area is great for those fortunate enough to have it, but a smaller area can still be useful in feng shui design.

Feng shui techniques are identical whether you are working in your garden or your home. Your yard's bagua, or energy map, is an extension of your home’s bagua, so it is important to figure out your home’s first.

There are five elements in feng shui theory, and you should understand how to apply each of them to intensify the energy.

The northeast corner of your garden, for instance, connects to personal growth and self-cultivation energy, and Earth is the feng shui element that is important to incorporate it. Since rocks epitomize the Earth element in feng shui, you might give some thought to putting some into a peaceful Zen garden in the northeast corner of your yard.

A water element is a suitable addition to the following feng shui areas: Southeast (money & abundance), East (health & family), and North (career & path in life).

Impressive Water Features Around the World

The King Fahd Fountain (built in 1985) in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, has the tallest consistently-running fountain on the planet. The water here jets up to a elevation of 260 meters (853 feet) above the Red Sea.

The Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002), comes in 2nd with water levels of 202 meters (663 feet).

Located next to the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri, is third placed Gateway Geyser (1995). With water reaching 192 meters (630 feet) in the air, this water fountain is the tallest in the U.S..

With water jetting 190 meters (620 feet) in the air, the Port Fountain in Karachi, Pakistan makes it on the list.

Fountain Park in Fountain Hills, Arizona is number 4: it can jet water 171 meters (561 feet) high when the three pumps function at full capacity, it is usually limited to 91 meters (300 feet).

The Dubai Fountain which made its debut in 2009 is located next to highest building worldwide, the famous Burj Khalifa. The fountain shoots water up to 73 meters (240 feet) and performs once every half hour to pre-recorded music - and even has extreme shooters, not used in every show, which reach up to 150 meters (490 feet).

Propelling water up to 147 meters (482 feet) high, the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet (1970) in Canberra, Australia, comes in seventh.

And at number 8, we have the the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951), measuring 140 meters (460 feet).


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