The Famed Revelation Garden Fountain at Chatsworth Gardens

“Revelation,” the most recent inclusion to the decorative garden fountains of Chatsworth, was designed by well-known British sculptor Angela Conner. The now deceased 11th Duke of Devonshire commissioned her, because of her work in brass and steel, to create a limited edition bust of Queen Elizabeth in celebration of the Queen’s 80th birthday. In 1999 Revelation was mounted in Jack Pond, one of Chatsworth’s oldest ponds. Alternatively hiding and displaying a golden globe at the sculpture’s center, the steel fountain takes the form of four large flower petals that open and close with the circulation of water. s_250_on_pd_151__02463.jpg A gold dust painted metal globe was created and incorporated to the prominent sculpture standing five meters in height and five meters wide. This newest water feature is an interesting and unique addition to the Gardens of Chatsworth, because the motion of flower petals is completely driven by water.

The Prevalence of Fountains in Japanese Gardens

Japanese gardens typically feature a water element. They tend to be placed right at the entrance of Japanese temples and homes because they are regarded as being representative of spiritual and physical cleansing. It is uncommon to see elaborately -designed Japanese fountains because the emphasis is supposed to be on the water itself.

Many people also get a water fountain that features a bamboo spout. Under the bamboo spout is typically a stone basin which receives the water as it flows down from the spout. It must have a worn-down, weathered look as well. People want their fountain to look as natural as possible, so they put plants, flowers, and stones around the fountain. To the owner of the fountain, it obviously is more than just nice decor.

If you want to get a bit more imaginative, try a stone fountain embellished with live bamboo and other natural elements placed on a bed of gravel. In time, as moss slowly covers the stones, it becomes even more natural-looking.

Bigger water features can be developed if there is enough open land. Lots of people include a koi pond or a little stream as a final touch.

Japanese fountains, though, do not actually need to have water in them.

Many people prefer to represent water with sand, gravel, or rocks rather than putting in real water. The illusion of a creek with moving water can also be achieved by placing flat stones very closely together.

Santa Maria in Cosmedin: A Roman Fountain Worth Viewing

Archaeologists and restorers alike have stumbled upon a wealth of heathen and Christian relics on the site of Santa Maria in Cosmedin in Rome. The nearby basilica is largely for the marble sculpture known as the Bocca della Verità, (Mouth of Truth) located in its entryway. When the Santa Maria in Cosmedin fountain was constructed in 1719, it was off the beaten track and mostly unknown as a result. Since the nearby area was depressing and mostly uninhabited, visitors were not particularly interested in visiting it. As part of an effort to revitalize the piazza outside the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin, the Italian architect Carlo Bizzaccheri was instructed by Pope Clement XI to design a fountain. August 11, 1717 marked the date when work on the church’s infrastructure began. After blessing of the first stone, medals bearing the illustration of the Blessed Virgin, for whom the church is named, and of St. John the Baptist, the patron saint of water, were thrown into the foundation.

The World’s Biggest Water Fountains

Referred to as the King Fahd Fountain (1985) located in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, it is the highest continuously operating fountain in the world. The water here shoots up to a height of 260 meters (853 feet) above the Red Sea.

The Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002), comes in second with water heights of 202 meters (663 feet).

The Gateway Geyser (1995) situated next to the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri is number three on the list. It rockets water 192 meters (630 feet) into the air and is currently the tallest fountain in the United States.

Next is Port Fountain (2006) in Karachi, Pakistan, where the water jets 190 meters (620 feet) high.

Number 4 is Water at Fountain Park (1970) situated in Fountain Hills, Arizona - it can attain up to 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are running, even though it normally only hits up to 91 meters (300 feet).

The Dubai Fountain opened in 2009 near to Burj Khalifa - the world's highest building. It dances to pre-recorded music every half hour and propels water to the height of 73 meters (240 feet) - it also has extreme shooters which reach 150 meters (490 feet), though these are only used on special occasions.

Number 7 is the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet in Canberra, completed in 1970, propelling water 147 meters (482 feet) high.

Last of all is the Jet d’Eau (1951) in Geneva, Switzerland, which measures 140 meters (460 feet).

Kitties and Fountains They Can Appreciate

Does your cat like to leap onto the counter when he hears the tap? Does he sip water from the toilet or touch the water in his bowl before trying it? Strange as these behaviors sound, they actually show a cat’s natural instinct to avoid still standing water. In most cases, they will not seek out much water to drink.

Felines in the wild generally get the water they need from meats containing water. Consequently, felines never developed the instinct to drink water. Pet cats, though, count on you for their water, as they do not get the enough hydration from their foods. Make water easily attainable to your cat by installing a cat fountain.

If you put one in, you can rest easy knowing your cat has easy access to water. The variety of different models will let you to pick a fountain best suited to your cat. There are fountains that always have constant flowing clean water while others have a basin which refills as your pet cat drinks from it.

Where did Garden Water Fountains Come From?

A fountain, an incredible piece of engineering, not only supplies drinking water as it pours into a basin, it can also propel water high into the air for an extraordinary effect.

Pure practicality was the original role of fountains. People in cities, towns and villages received their drinking water, as well as water to bathe and wash, from aqueducts or springs in the area. Until the late 19th, century most water fountains operated using gravity to allow water to flow or jet into the air, therefore, they needed a source of water such as a reservoir or aqueduct located higher than the fountain. Acting as an element of adornment and celebration, fountains also generated clean, fresh drinking water. The main components used by the Romans to create their fountains were bronze or stone masks, mostly illustrating animals or heroes. To illustrate the gardens of paradise, Muslim and Moorish garden planners of the Middle Ages added fountains to their designs. The fountains seen in the Gardens of Versailles were supposed to show the power over nature held by King Louis XIV of France. Seventeen and 18 century Popes sought to extol their positions by including beautiful baroque-style fountains at the point where restored Roman aqueducts arrived into the city.

The end of the nineteenth century saw the rise in usage of indoor plumbing to provide drinking water, so urban fountains were relegated to strictly decorative elements. The introduction of unique water effects and the recycling of water were 2 things made possible by swapping gravity with mechanical pumps.

Modern-day fountains function mostly as decoration for community spaces, to honor individuals or events, and enhance entertainment and recreational events.

Outdoor Garden Fountains Lost to History

The water from rivers and other sources was originally supplied to the occupants of nearby towns and municipalities via water fountains, whose purpose was largely practical, not aesthetic. Gravity was the power source of water fountains up until the close of the 19th century, using the forceful power of water traveling down hill from a spring or creek to force the water through valves or other outlets. Fountains throughout history have been developed as monuments, impressing hometown citizens and tourists alike. The contemporary fountains of modern times bear little likeness to the first water fountains. The very first known water fountain was a rock basin created that served as a container for drinking water and ceremonial functions. Stone basins are believed to have been 1st made use of around 2000 BC. The first fountains put to use in ancient civilizations relied on gravity to manipulate the flow of water through the fountain. Drinking water was provided by public fountains, long before fountains became ornate public monuments, as pretty as they are functional. Fountains with ornamental Gods, mythological monsters, and animals began to show up in Rome in about 6 BC, made from rock and bronze. The impressive aqueducts of Rome provided water to the incredible public fountains, many of which you can visit today.


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